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Athletics Vs. COVID

In any other year, CB and nearly every other school or university would be in class, doing sports, or anything normal in the life of school. Now, though, we are stuck in front of a desk, watching the same screen for eight hours a day, five days a week. This is even more severe for […]

In any other year, CB and nearly every other school or university would be in class, doing sports, or anything normal in the life of school. Now, though, we are stuck in front of a desk, watching the same screen for eight hours a day, five days a week. This is even more severe for athletics; the fall sports are completely cancelled, with spring sports having a slim chance of coming back next year. This is all thanks to the arrival of COVID earlier this year, showing no signs of stopping anywhere near soon.

Shutting down a sport is easy, if you compare it to trying to return a year later. At stake? Jobs, money, life, and family members or loved ones. Far more important than a bit of entertainment every other week for all the football lovers. Originally, there was hope that the pandemic situation would be fixed for pro sports, or even for normal sports. Sadly, that’s not the case. Broadcaster Michael Kay gives us an example when Yankee athlete Aroldis Chapman was subbed in for by a new pitcher.

“He’s filling in for Aroldis Chapman, who was starting the season on the Covid-19 list. He’s back, he’s had two negative tests in a row, but they don’t want to rush him. They want him to face some batters. So Britton is the closer until Chapman gets back.”

Chapman had apparently started the season on the injured list. This included rehab, and he was soon to rejoin the team as pitcher. The injury? Coronavirus.

The Yankees athlete is one example of many in pro sports, and will continue to be so until there are either no more public events or when a “cure” or vaccine will come for covid.

Smaller schools or sport programs, however, are in completely different situations. The idea of “coming back” isn’t even around for fall, but for next spring season.

With the pandemic already being a big deal for professional levels of sports, how has it affected high schools and colleges?

“The pandemic has put a huge halt to our on campus athletics,” says Assistant Athletic Director Ms. Melissa Flowers. “Because we are not allowed to be in the same space, our coaches have adapted to utilizing our Plt4m app that helps create workouts for their teams. They have also been hosting meetings and workouts via zoom.”

With the upcoming technology, things like setting up schedules for others shouldn’t be too hard. The main issue for online meetings and teachings would be motivation to continue, though.

Currently, there is no specific time or prediction as to when athletes return to normal activities. When do you think this will occur?

“I believe that we will not know until mid October or November how changes will take place for Season One.” Says Mr. Milton. Without even a estimate for when a vaccine will be made, nobody really knows when things will get good enough for public meetings.

With the “when” out of the way, “what” do you think will change as athletics return to the public?

” I believe that CB athletics and maybe athletics in general, are going to be different. Like everything else, this virus will force us to rethink large groups and meetings. ” Cross Country Coach Mr. Danny Delgado ’79 says. These new choices are going to be based off ” our collective will to do what is needed now,’ Quoting Delgado again. Without enough motivation and commitment, high school sports will ” be forced to change in ways no one could have ever imagined. Nothing will eve be old normal again. We will have to accept a very new normal that many will neither recognize nor like.”

The current state of sports is based off the community’s choice; nothing more can be said with all the unknown factors of COVID.

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