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Club Management For Dummies

Remember Club Day and all those sign up sheets you wrote your name on (or your friend’s name)? So did you actually attended that first meeting? Did you even accept the Schoology group invitation? Over 50 clubs made an appearance on Club Day back in August. Students gathered on the lawn where poster boards, candy, […]

Remember Club Day and all those sign up sheets you wrote your name on (or your friend’s name)? So did you actually attended that first meeting? Did you even accept the Schoology group invitation?

Over 50 clubs made an appearance on Club Day back in August. Students gathered on the lawn where poster boards, candy, and sign up sheets decorated the tables. Every year, Club Day opens the door for students to get more involved in the CB community, meet new people, and maybe earn some service hours. This year we saw a lot of CB’s well-known clubs like Open Mic Club and Wellspring Breakfast Club, a few younger clubs like All Voices Heard, and a handful of brand new ones.

The school administration is incredibly supportive if you’ve got an idea for a club. They’ll let you take an idea and run with it. Any student can make a club with the permission of a teacher moderator and the administration. But from there, it’s up to you to make that club something more than just a Schoology group.

Managing a club as a student becomes the real challenge. Many clubs have experienced the struggles of keeping people coming to meetings — food bribery can only get you so far.

“It’s really easy to get sign ups on club day — that’s never a problem,” explains Jacey Greco (‘20), co-president of both Young Conservatives and All Voices Heard. “The problem is keeping [students] committed. You realize as the year goes on you don’t have the time to do everything.”

She points out that “in order to make it any kind of priority, you have to appeal to a demographic.”

All Voices Heard originally started out as Speech and Debate Club. Jacey realized CB didn’t have a formal speech and debate team on Club Day her freshman year. At the beginning of sophomore year, Jacey, Chris Fong (’20), Giovanni DelPiero (,20), and Wyatt Greco (’20) started one.

But things didn’t quite go as planned. They couldn’t find enough people that actually wanted to be dedicated to joining a speech and debate team. The club instead evolved into a place for their friends to hang out during all school lunch. The direction of the club shifted from a formal debate club looking to enter competitions to something more friend-oriented and informal. The next year, Jacey and the other club leaders changed Speech and Debate Club to All Voices Heard.

Today, the club is a group of friends that meets on Thursday lunches when possible to do improv games or help each other out with presentations, formal essays, and speeches for class. The format of the club changed so it would be more fun, as Jacey emphasizes that running and being a part of a club “shouldn’t feel like a chore.”

“I am a big believer in the students running the club. The students should be coming up with the activities…it’s all student driven,” says Ms. Mary Bowers, moderator for Young Conservatives, Pro-Life Club, and Academic Decathlon. “The biggest thing I as a moderator do is make sure we have a transfer of leadership from year to year.”

Club presidents come and go, but a lot of responsibility falls on these students. Being a club president is not always an easy job.

“You need to have some creativity,” Ms. Bowers advises. “You can’t just have every meeting people sitting around and staring at each other. You’ve got to have plans for meetings and a purpose for every meeting. You need to include people in decision making and let them know that they are valued.”

Club presidents dedicate their time and energy to keep people involved and excited. Take into account your audience and get creative with club activities. Don’t be afraid to try something new!

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