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A Worm In The Apple

    (Illustration by Joaquin Romero) Picture this: you’re sitting in class, just minding your own business, ya know, playing some games and suddenly your teacher calls you out. How did they know you were playing 2048? It’s almost as of they could see you were just about to combine those 1024 tiles, spying in […]

 

 

(Illustration by Joaquin Romero)

Picture this: you’re sitting in class, just minding your own business, ya know, playing some games and suddenly your teacher calls you out. How did they know you were playing 2048? It’s almost as of they could see you were just about to combine those 1024 tiles, spying in the screen of your iPad. Well guess what, that’s exactly what they can do by utilizing Apple Classroom, Apple’s newest technology.

If you haven’t heard, some CB teachers have begun implementing Apple Classroom into their own teaching methods. But there has been some confusion among students about what teachers are capable of viewing on our iPads when logged into their classroom.

After hearing a series of rumors about teachers invading our privacy by reading through our texts and emails, I decided to get down to the bottom of it. What exactly can teachers view when using Apple Classroom?

According to Apple’s website, teachers cannot navigate on our iPads. In fact, teachers are only capable of a few things in Apple Classroom. These include viewing what app a student is currently on, sharing documents to the whole class at one time, and viewing a timeline of each student’s activities on their iPad while in the classroom. Apple advertises that “Apple Classroom helps teachers focus on teaching so students can focus on learning.”

Olivia Busch (’18) gamin’ in class.

So teachers cannot read our text messages or emails, and they cannot see what we do on our iPads at home. But some students are not convinced. Out of sheer curiosity, I decided to seek concerns and opinions about Apple Classroom.

“I’ve heard Apple Classroom is this weird thing where teachers can just kind of, for lack of a better word, creep on what students are doing,” Madeleine Molitor(‘18) said.  “It’s honestly pretty freaky and a lack of privacy. A main concern I have is just that this is the future of technology.”

“Apple Classroom sounds like a cool breakthrough for teachers, but I am not a huge fan of someone being able to see my iPad screen at any moment,” said Matthew Miles (‘18). “I feel like it will be an invasion of privacy.”

He feels conflicted about the technology, as it will only bring up more problems regarding student teacher relationships.

“If Apple Classroom actually starts being used, I feel like students will always feel like they are being watched and that will add stress to our lives. I’ve heard that teachers will be able to control our iPads too and that seems a little extra. Teachers can just tell me to get off my iPad — they don’t need to turn it off or change my screen.”

One of Matthew’s points piqued my interest. This was the first time I heard about the concern about trust. Apple Classroom may be a useful tool for students do not remain on task, but what about the students who do what that are told?  The issue with Apple Classroom is that it feels like a punishment.

So then the question about whether or not it’s mandatory arose. And to answer that question simply; yes, it is mandatory if teachers require it. Basically, teachers can count Apple Classroom as participation points and use leverage to motivate students to join or else they will lose points and damage their grade.

Mr. Havey ‘83 touched on the fact that disciplinary action regarding a students’ ability to stay on task should be a conversation, not a bad score on an assignment.

“I think the biggest obstacle for students using iPads is staying on task. So I’m just trying to help them with their electronic addiction,” he explained. “I wouldn’t include punishment towards grades because punitive issues should be a conversation with the deans.”

While all of these are valid concerns and opinions, Apple Classroom is ultimately used by teachers to prevent cheating and help students focus. But luckily for those who are despise this new technology, CB is only testing out this program for now. No final decision has been made about whether or not it will be implemented next year.

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