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Don’t Be *Bleep*, Get Some Sleep

Who knew that Korean game shows would be the downfall of my academic career? For a week now, I’ve been binge watching the first season of a Korean game show called “The Genius.” That’s approximately 18 hours of content. As a result, my sleep schedule has shifted. My average of 6-7 hours of sleep has […]

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Who knew that Korean game shows would be the downfall of my academic career?

For a week now, I’ve been binge watching the first season of a Korean game show called “The Genius.” That’s approximately 18 hours of content. As a result, my sleep schedule has shifted. My average of 6-7 hours of sleep has dropped to 4-5 hours, and suddenly, it’s much harder to stay awake in class.

While other students at Christian Brothers might not be watching TV shows in Korean, issues with sleep have become all too common. CB’s doors have only been open for a little over three months now, but exhaustion is already a way of life for some students.

“Sleep has become a joke,” remarks junior Cesar Lopez (’18).

Cesar says that he often has to choose to do his homework over going to sleep. And this problem is bigger than just one or two students — many other students also say that academics get in the way of their rest.

“[I prioritize] based on how important the homework assignment is,” reports freshman Carson Bates (’20). “I have to manage my time as best I can in order to go to bed.”

“I have a lot of homework, and sports play a big part too,” adds varsity cross country runner Alieen Fortin (’19). “I get home later, and that means I go to sleep later too.”

“There’s a lot more work in junior year so I’m still tying to get adjusted,” says Homecoming Court nominee Daniel Ledesma (’18).

“I think that it’s a struggle for some students to get enough sleep,” comments Jaela Harding (’17).

It’s clear that students don’t, or at least are struggling to, get the necessary amount of sleep. Unfortunately, this deficiency can cause students to sleep in class. The negative effects of this are obvious — if students nap in class, they will need to take time outside of class to catch up.

This extra studying outside of class inevitably cuts into a student’s slumber more, and eventually, a vicious cycle of sleep deprivation is born. To delve more into this serious issue, we asked math teachers Ms. Kelly Safford and Ms. Carla Albright ’04 about their views on student sleep.

“The demands on students are greater than they used to be,” acknowledges Ms. Safford. “Students feel like they should be taking more difficult courses — more AP classes — and those require more time.”

These expectations are often compounded by that fact that CB is a college prep school.

“I think the Internet has helped us, but it’s also made things more difficult,” Ms. Safford continues. “We have so much more information, [so] we’re supposed to know more.”

Ms. Safford is correct — the expectations we students face are much greater than they used to be. And yes, it’s hard to get everything done. But as students, we also need to recognize when we aren’t putting in enough effort to get the job done. Perhaps I’m the only one who wastes his time away by watching a Korean game show, but I’m pretty sure there are others who spend their time messaging their friends, filtering their social media posts, or watching YouTube videos.

And as Ms. Albright points out, our own procrastination is often the reason for our later bedtimes.

“Part of it is a lack of time management,” says Ms. Albright. “I’m a firm believer in having a little bit of ‘you time.’ However, I think that a lot of [students] take a lot of ‘you time’ and don’t give homework enough time too.”

I can’t really tell others to go to bed earlier or to procrastinate less because then I would be a hypocrite. However, I hope that others can learn from my experiences.

This Korean TV show isn’t the first thing to affect my sleep schedule. To many of my freshman and sophomore teachers, I was known as that student that fell asleep in class. It didn’t matter what was happening, I always fell asleep — during lectures, while finishing assignments, and even during some harrowing tests and quizzes.

As a junior, I’m trying to learn from my past. I may slip into old habits and doze off a few times, but I really am trying to correct my mistakes. And trust me, sleeping in class is a mistake.

For me, the worst part of sleeping in class is not the extra time that I needed to study. It’s knowing that I’ve failed my teachers, knowing that I’ve disrespected them, even unintentionally.

This might sound dramatic to some, but teachers put in a lot of effort to plan their lessons. By sleeping through a class, you’re basically telling a teacher that you don’t appreciate their efforts to educate you. You’re telling them that you don’t care that they’re trying to help you get ahead.

This Korean TV show isn’t the first thing to affect my sleep schedule, but I’m hoping that it will be the last. I’m hoping that writing this article will remind me to stop being off task so much. Most of all, I’m hoping that this article captures how sorry I am to all the teachers who have ever needed to put up with me.

So to all my teachers, past and present, I’m sorry for not paying attention. I’m sorry for putting my head down. I’m really, truly, deeply sorry and hope you’ll forgive me.

And to the students, learn from my mistakes. Don’t sleep in class — you’ll regret it.

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