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The Walking Wounded

Being injured? It stinks. We seem to not realize the simpleness of walking up the stairs until suddenly you’re forced to walk across campus in order to get to your math class. As many of us have seen, rocking the crutches and the wheelchair look is not uncommon within our wildly active community. The Talon […]

injuries

Being injured? It stinks. We seem to not realize the simpleness of walking up the stairs until suddenly you’re forced to walk across campus in order to get to your math class. As many of us have seen, rocking the crutches and the wheelchair look is not uncommon within our wildly active community. The Talon went out and interviewed two of our Lady Falcon basketball players, both with knee injuries.

Ahlayjah Dahl (’18) started off this school year on crutches. She tells The Talon that she had surgery over the summer in order to fix the cartilage that was slowly detaching from her knee.

“I’ve had this condition since I was in 7th grade because I’ve been playing basketball since 4th so it was all of the wear and tear I put on my knees,” she explains that.

When asked, Ahlayjah can remember the exact day that she could walk up the stairs again: September 10th. Her favorite story from the elevator was when the door was closing and she threw her crutch in order to catch the door.

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The STEM wing stairs seem like Mt. Everest to our injured Falcons.

Kalani Mark (’17) ended the last school year on crutches because of a torn ACL, fractured tibia, and sprained MCL. She also got to experience the elevator for almost five months. She and Ahlayjah had similar complaint about the elevator being too slow and consistently making them late for their classes. Another inconvenience was the long walk to the elevator in order to go from the 200’s to the 100’s.

Somehow, the class rotation never seems to work with the amount of times going up and down the elevator. Luckily, both of these Lady Falcons will be back and stronger than ever going into this upcoming season.

From personal experience, I can definitely agree with the fact that it takes a lot longer to get from class to class. Even though I was only on crutches for a week, standing in the elevator full of teachers is not the way that I would prefer to spend my passing periods. Anyone who has even had to be in crutches or a wheelchair can fully understand the constant questioning of  “What happened to you?” Although the thought is nice, constantly answering this question can become repetitive.

Although the elevator may seems mysterious to those who have never been in it, some of our seasoned elevator veterans can quickly change these ideas. Hopefully all of our Falcons with wounded limbs, heal fast so they can go back to flying as high as ever!

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