Falcon Sports
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Muay Thai Momentum

  Another week of school with homework, tests and Muay Thai training? This is exactly what Raul Arambula’s (’17) week consists of. His training journey started with an invitation from his mom. “I started Muay Thai about two years ago over the summer one day when my mom asked me if I wanted to come […]

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Another week of school with homework, tests and Muay Thai training? This is exactly what Raul Arambula’s (’17) week consists of. His training journey started with an invitation from his mom.

“I started Muay Thai about two years ago over the summer one day when my mom asked me if I wanted to come along with her,” explained Raul.

As with most sports, Muay Thai training takes a lot of time.

“Whether I’m at the gym training for Muay Thai or weight lifting, I’m usually dedicating at least an hour almost every day to training,” he says about his endless dedication to the sport.

He also gave the Talon a background and outerwear of Muay Thai.

“It’s from Thailand — when we bow, we say it in Taiwanese. We wear Muay Thai shorts that are kind of almost as short as cross country shorts. Sometimes people have ankle wraps. I use them because my ankles are kind of messed up. Usually you just wrap your hands however you want — I wrap mine Mexican style and then you have your gloves. But when you fight, before the fight you usually have bands around your biceps and a headband too.”

Although Raul is dedicated in training to this sport, it was not his first martial arts training experience.

“I used to do Taekwondo when I was little — in like 3rd grade. I went up all the way to 8th grade and I got tired of that but I still kind of loved sparring, and so Muay Thai is just mostly sparring and fighting so I thought it was the next best thing.”

Raul laughed as he told a fun story of his training at Legacy Muay Thai in Sacramento.

“One time in class we were practicing kicks and my mom held the bag, and I was doing a back kick and I kicked her so hard she flew across the class. Everyone started laughing but she was fine, but it was still funny,” he says. “We push each other hard.”

Martial artists have to be centered at all times, whether it’s in school, at home or the training area. This means to have a personal best performance in every aspect of life.

“My trainer Fernando wanted me to start fighting last year, but school got pretty hectic because it was junior year so taking the SAT and ACT, making sure my grades were good made it kind of hard,” he says. “I might start training to actually fight.”

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