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Hatching A Falcon

Ms. Blaire Moskat puts her hand on her belly. She’s pregnant — 36 weeks in — and she feels a little tired, but you can’t really tell. She still smiles and waves and does her job with more energy than we sleep-deprived students can muster up. But being pregnant definitely leaves her exhausted. She takes her leave […]

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Ms. Blaire Moskat puts her hand on her belly. She’s pregnant — 36 weeks in — and she feels a little tired, but you can’t really tell. She still smiles and waves and does her job with more energy than we sleep-deprived students can muster up. But being pregnant definitely leaves her exhausted. She takes her leave in about three weeks, and there’s still much to do.

For seven years now, Ms. Moskat has served as one of CB’s class counselors. That’s seven years of pushing CB students in the right directions, seven years of helping CB students with whatever issues they have. On the side, she also helps head the Peer Tutoring program with Ms. Cynthia Grajeda.

That might sound like a lot of work.

It is.

“Oh wait, okay. Something’s going on in there,” she says suddenly as her baby kicks. Kicking is among many of the challenges that come with working while pregnant. 

Ms. Carla Albright ‘04, the energetic and compassionate math teacher in Room 605, offers a different challenge. 

“Your belly at a certain point starts to grow,” she tells the Talon. “It gets big quickly. You have to make sure you’re not standing right at the door to greet kids. You have to make sure you’re back a step or else you might belly bump everyone.”

“Growing a human makes you tired,” she added with a laugh.

As Ms. Albright points out, pregnancy is hard. There are accidental belly bumps, fatigue, strange cravings for peaches, and a whole host of other irritations that come with growing a child inside you.  Surprisingly, Ms. Moskat didn’t mention any of this when asked about the biggest challenge of maternity.

“I think it’s just making sure everything’s in place for the junior class and for the sub that’s gonna come in,” she says. “I want to make sure I’ve got all my ducks in a row before I leave.”

It seems like most of the ducks are already lined up. Ms. Moskat has been training her substitute, Ms. April Malarkey, and showing her around the campus to meet with teachers and students. She’s also calling students to her office to talk with them one last time before she leaves.

“It’s stressful,” she says with a grin, “but I’m prepared to hand off the torch.”

Ms. Albright also agrees that preparing for her departure is stressful. She is leaving right around finals, and the stress is understandable — she teaches five math classes worth of students, over half of which are freshmen. She also moderates the Fitness Club, which means working out while pregnant.

That might sound just as hard as being a counselor.

It is.

Ms. Albright is ready though. Lesson plans for when she’s gone have been mostly written. Her sub will have all the tests and worksheets that he or she will need in her absence. And while a sub hasn’t been announced yet, Ms. Albright and the Math Department have begun the careful process of choosing one.

“I am already prepared for when I leave, as much as I can be at this point,” she says.

So, is working at CB hard? Yeah.

Is working while pregnant harder? Yeah.

Do Ms. Moskat and Ms. Albright make it look easy? Yeah.

So we’d like thank Ms. Moskat and Ms. Albright for all the work they do here at Christian Brothers. We wish them both well on their breaks and can’t wait to welcome the newest members of the Falcon Family.

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