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CB Policies You Didn’t Know Existed

For those who don’t actually read the Parent-Student Handbook, this is for you. Since when are shorts against the dress code? The CB parent-student handbook is updated by the adminstration and signed by incoming students each year. However, like most terms and conditions, they are not always carefully read. On page 31, the behavior code […]

For those who don’t actually read the Parent-Student Handbook, this is for you.

Since when are shorts against the dress code? The CB parent-student handbook is updated by the adminstration and signed by incoming students each year. However, like most terms and conditions, they are not always carefully read.

On page 31, the behavior code for dances prohibits any “sandwiching” on the dance floor. No, this does not include your BLTs and PB&Js. In fact, “sandwiching” is a type of dance where a group of people assemble into your typical middle school “grind-train” that originated in the 2000s. The wording of this CB policy may be out of date, but the heartfelt message still stands: freaking is gross, don’t do it.

On a more serious note, the CB dress code includes guidelines about your clothes, as well as your face, hair, and jewelry. According to the Parent-Student-Handbook (PSHB for short), “excessive make up is unacceptable”. But how much makeup is “distracting” and who decides how much is too much?

According to the PHSB, the deans have the final say on what your face looks like on campus. If they judge your facial hair or makeup to be “inappropriate”, you may find yourself in a new after school extracurricular activity — detention.

Technically, beanies and hoods are never to be worn on campus “including at breaks and lunchtime”(page 20) As for jewelry, bulky chains and necklaces clash with CB khakis and tees anyways, so this additional rule is common sense and unnecessary.

Want pizza delivered to you at lunch? THINK AGAIN! Food, balloon, flower, and other creative deliveries are not permitted. Vending machines are always an available solution to your classroom cravings, however, “students who use them do so at their own financial risk” aka CB is not responsible for your twenty-five-cent refunds.

If any administrators find a student to be under the influence they must first call the student’s parents. If the parents do not allow the student to be tested, the student will not be allowed back into school. This policy showcases the significance of the “parent” factor of the parent-student handbook.

Overall, the PSHB’s policies go mostly undiscovered. Most of the codes of conduct go without saying and luckily (most of) Lasallian students have common sense, so let’s leave it at this: “The hallmark of a CBHS student is conduct that treats the entire school community with kindness, courtesy, and a helping hand”(page 22).

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