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Students & Their Cars: What’s In ‘Em & Why

The bond that a student shares with their car is one of the strongest things in the natural world. For most, it’s their first taste of real independence and adulthood. The cars become a reflection of the driver, with some kept in pristine condition with a spotless exterior and a neat interior while others don’t […]

The bond that a student shares with their car is one of the strongest things in the natural world. For most, it’s their first taste of real independence and adulthood. The cars become a reflection of the driver, with some kept in pristine condition with a spotless exterior and a neat interior while others don’t get cleaned inside for years, leading to a time capsule of random items and Taco Bell wrappers from 2018.

As a student with a car, I tend to fall on the messy side. Before I cleaned out my car, it was a cluttered mess that reeked of chlorine from towels and swim gear left in the car after water polo practices. Other mementos one would find if they looked in the car would include various fast food receipts, tubes of paint that I had forgotten to take out, an empty bottle of 5-W30 motor oil, around $20 in loose change, and two lamb skin seat covers that were left in the trunk from the previous owner. Living in a rural town with no car wash made sure the car was always coated in a nice layer of dust.

Dakota Jones (’21) is CB’s resident car guy, driving an ’03 BMW 325 Coupe. As someone who has a deep interest and passion for cars, Dakota keeps his car as clean as possible.

“I keep it as clean as possible so I can easily find what I need,” he says. I like a clean looking car — it makes it look nicer. Also stuff doesn’t fly around.”

Anyone that looks in Dakota’s car might find items that could be of use to him. He is prepared for most occurrences that could happen, whether it’s a dead battery, engine trouble, or going into the store. And if his car has a CD player, he might as well use it.

“Essentials I keep in my car always are tools, jumper cables, masks, hand sanitizer, and CDs” he says.

Other students like Andre Verspieren (’22) once had a pretty chaotic car interior, but had a change of heart and developed reasons to keep it clean.

“My dad always yelled at me when I kept it dirty and that way my friends have room in the car” says Andre.

Bill Rockas (’21) has one of the most interesting and unique cars on campus. You’d be hard pressed to find another high schooler driving a convertible Jaguar from 1998. Cool, but weird and ancient is synonymous with Bill Rockas at this point.

“I don’t mind the outside of my car being messy because it doesn’t affect the utility of the vehicle. My unusually old car also requires manual washing, which entails more time, effort, and driving than I’m usually willing to take,” Bill says. “That said, I am committed to my bizarre and ancient convertible.”

With facemasks required to enter any location outside of your house nowadays, they’re something people can’t go without. For some people, this means that you can find as many masks in their cars as you would random quarters under your couch.

“I have about ieigh masks hidden in my two-seater car. They’re an essential item nowadays and I always fear that I might be caught short” says Bill. “It also gives me a small wardrobe to pick from: the standard black mask, my cheetah print mask, my mask patterned with different dog breeds, and a variety of straps to choose.”

When a person drives one car for long enough, the car starts to become a reflection of the driver and the world around the driver. After a while, items left in the car start to paint a picture of who the driver is.

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