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Farm To Fork: Agricultural Lifestyle Through The Eyes Of CB Students

As 2020 continues to surprise each one of us with a pandemic, massive wildfires, and an edge of your seat presidential election, there seems to be very few guarantees left in this world. Fortunately for us, one of these guarantees includes the consistent work of farmers. The agricultural field tends to be underappreciated, if not […]

As 2020 continues to surprise each one of us with a pandemic, massive wildfires, and an edge of your seat presidential election, there seems to be very few guarantees left in this world. Fortunately for us, one of these guarantees includes the consistent work of farmers. The agricultural field tends to be underappreciated, if not completely unrecognized, and there are many people on CB’s campus involved in agriculture.

Joe Solari (‘21) became intrigued with farming over this past summer and began emailing farms around his area in hopes of getting a job that allowed him to work with nature, as it’s something he says he’s always been drawn to.

”When I started getting into farming, I fell in love with the process of how these crops grow.”

Joe showing off some of the produce grown at Wildgust Farms

After reaching out to a number of farms in the Sacramento area, he landed a job at Wildgust Farms, an organic farm in West Sacramento. Since then, he’s worked one to two days a week, doing tasks such as laying irrigation, planting and processing crops, running water, cultivating weeds, and tackling pests in order to maintain the farm.

Joe’s perspective on agriculture has changed quite a bit since he’s been hired, as he previously had no idea what the farming industry consisted of.

“I have been exposed to the damage industrial farming has on our environment,” the senior says. It makes me want to pursue a way of growing that is in harmony with nature.”

Joe’s newfound interest has taught him a lot and has become more than just a weekly chore to him.

“I would most definitely grow an actual career out of farming, especially after feeling the need to be on the right side of agriculture. I feel if more people understood how much it takes to grow food, they would be much less wasteful.”

While Joe continues out his newfound career weekly, Rubi Fernandez (‘21) has been well educated on agriculture throughout her entire life, as she resides on her family farm in Herald. She recalls being brought up into a farm environment, which inevitably affected her perspective on the average everyday city life many other CB students experience.

Rubi alongside one of the many precious animals residing on her family farm.

“I’ve been going to school in the city, which is 25 miles away from home, my whole life, so long commutes and having a less-than-average life were things I just had to get used to,” she says. “I definitely don’t have a lot of experience with street smarts though, which I had to learn the hard way, and seeing the difference between how I live versus my peers was always so odd to me.”

While Rubi is grateful for the opportunities she has had such as raising animals and gardening or even the more strenuous chores she’s faced with on the farm, Rubi recognizes that she wouldn’t have a lot of the things she enjoys if she lived in a suburban or city neighborhood. While she cannot identify with a city lifestyle entirely, she’s trying her best to learn to adapt to a highly populated area as she realizes that she’ll be pushed out of her comfort zone come during her freshman year of college next year.

“I think in many ways it has given me opportunities that those who live in the suburbs otherwise wouldn’t have,” the senior says. “But thinking about college and having to live in dorms and apartments, I’m realizing I really have no clue how to live in a highly populated area.”

Rain or sun, day or night, hot or cold, agriculture never sleeps. When one grows out of the industry, another phases into it. Whether it be through a family line or just out of general interest, agriculture will always be consistently working towards providing our population with good quality produce. Without the hard work of our farmers, we’d have nothing, and this is something that should be recognized more. Whether it be a daily commute from home to school or a weekly commute of home to work, farmers commitment to the farm to fork movement will never fade.

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