Community
0

How Far Will You Go? CB Students Take On Long Commutes

How long does it take you to get to school? Fifteen, twenty minutes? Longer? For some students, getting to school borders on being more of a road trip than an average morning drive and affects their social lives and school work. John Bonini (‘21), who lives in Rescue, says that “on a normal day, [his […]

How long does it take you to get to school? Fifteen, twenty minutes? Longer? For some students, getting to school borders on being more of a road trip than an average morning drive and affects their social lives and school work.

John Bonini (‘21), who lives in Rescue, says that “on a normal day, [his commute] takes an hour” and that “the lack of sleep [he] gets everyday, having to wake up earlier than all the other students, really affects [his] life.” Students living a good distance from school have to plan on finishing their homework early enough to still get a restful night’s sleep and prepare for waking up early the next morning. 

“Waking up maybe 45 minutes earlier than other students really adds up because when you think about it, that’s five days out of the week…and that’s a lot of minutes I’m missing” a deeply aggravated John said. “I want those minutes back! Where are my minutes, Rubi? I need them! Where did you put them?”

John says that coming to school tired keeps him from reaching his peak performance, and this constant exhaustion  is evident for most teenagers. Reports say that teenagers only get an average of seven hours of sleep when they need between nine to nine and a half hours of sleep per night to function best. 

When I asked John how the school could make the commute easier for him, he replied “move closer to me.” He then said more seriously that the school could follow the example that a multitude of other public and private schools are doing in switching to a 9:00 AM start.  Even the amount of homework could make a difference in diminishing the constant stress of a long commute. 

“The amount of homework that students get is ridiculous, especially when it’s just busy work students don’t need,” John says.

“You need Spanish and math homework,” he added, but if teachers could avoid assigning unnecessary homework, that would keep students from spending late nights doing work that does more harm than good. 

Rafael Fernandez (‘20) says that his commute ranges “anywhere between 40 minutes to an hour and a half.” Relying on the freeway for the majority of his commute can often make it longer than what he planned. He says he often finds himself with no time to finish his homework due to extracurriculars combined with the long commute. He says that starting school later will benefit students by “giving students more time to do what they need to get done and giving them more energy for the day.”

Students with a large distance between them and the school should not be punished for where they live. To benefit the students with these long commutes, the school could consider a later start and a lightened the workload. Governor Gavin Newsom recently passed a new law that requires all public high schools to start no earlier than 8:30 AM and will go into effect by July 1, 2022. Perhaps Christian Brothers will take note and follow in their footsteps. 

Share:
  • googleplus
  • linkedin
  • tumblr
  • rss
  • pinterest
  • mail