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Music Makes Memories

Bodies pushed against each other. Feet aching and stepped on. You’re desperate to catch a breath. Mouth dry and drenched in sweat. You’re desperate to sit down. But then the crowd screams, any space of your own is gone, the lights come on and it’s all worth it. Some call it chaos, most call it […]

Bodies pushed against each other. Feet aching and stepped on. You’re desperate to catch a breath. Mouth dry and drenched in sweat.

You’re desperate to sit down. But then the crowd screams, any space of your own is gone, the lights come on and it’s all worth it. Some call it chaos, most call it the time of their lives.

Live music is the closest one can get to an artist next to the speaker in the car. To some, music is just some words with a beat, but to others it’s a connection that can’t be matched. The Talon talked to some the biggest music fans at Christians Brothers to see their take on the loud and energy filled events that they will remember forever.

The cost to be part of such wild events can be quite pricey these days. But to some, no amount is worth the energy draining events. But we learned one does not always have to cash out for the exciting time and music with memories can take place anywhere. The Talon got the privilege to speak to religion teacher and proud musical advocate Mr. Julian Elorduy ‘03 for a blast in the past and an experience he has never forgotten.

“I was 16 or 17” Mr. Elodury explained, “at Espresso Metro which used to be at what is now Cafe Ambrosia in the K street Mall across from the Cathedral, I saw a band called the Coachwhips play in the men’s restroom to a very packed and hyped crowd.”

“It was the type of music you couldn’t help but dance to,” he recalled. “The drummer’s bum was sitting on a urinal because there was no room for a drummers throne….some people stood on the floor, others stood on the toilets overlooking the stalls. I was still quite tall then and my head was poking through the drop-ceiling panels.”

It didn’t take a huge venue or illegal substances for Mr. Elorduy to enjoy an experience of a lifetime.

“My little Catholic-boy self had never had so much fun dancing, sweating and having a grand old time,” he said gratefully. “No booze, no drugs, just a bunch of kids sweating away like that scene in Dirty Dancing without well all the ‘dirty dancing’…”

Concerts can be intense for some — almost too intense. Some don’t get the exciting experience until late in life. However, there are tough souls who take on the energy-draining challenge, leaving with life-long memories along with a couple of bruises. Lily Witry (‘20) explained some concerts she’s been to were some of the best nights of her life and some changed her life forever.

“Believe it or not my first concert was Britney Spears in first grade” she laughed. “My sister and mom had an extra ticket, so I was surprised when they asked if I would join. Our seats were pretty close but nothing like the chaos in the crowd.”

At a young age, Britney managed to inspire Lily and educate her on how animals can play into the live experience.

The author and Lily Witry attend a Kygo at the Greek Theater in Berkeley.

“Britney was amazing to see so young — she was so confident and she brought out a snake and everything it was wild to see her perform.”

Music is prioritized by the Witry family and brings them closer together.

“Music is highly valued in my family and my dads always been very excited to take me to concerts.”

Though concerts can be fun alone, Lily learned how going with loved ones can make the time even memorable.

“One of my most exciting was seeing the Swmrs play at Holy Diver. I went with two close friends and to experience that with them was also very personal for me. We danced and sang all night to every song and even got to meet the lead singer after,” she reminisced. “It’s a night I know I will never forget, even after the bruises from the mosh faded away.”

As wild as live concerts can be, some artists manage to provide a chill setting with equal amount of fun. Sam Noonan (‘20) explained it doesn’t always take such energy to remember the experience, but when it does, it’s totally worth it. When asked if it’s just the music that makes the experience, Sam explained how other factors play in too.

“If it’s a rap concert then I like a big venue, but if I’m going to a smaller concert like a Jai Wolf, then a smaller venue is better along with being with my friends and family,” the junior says. “When singing all the lyrics together with people that I don’t even know is such a good feeling, I can take everything off my mind, all the bad things going on in my life and focus on the song and lyrics that I know by heart. Music has a way of bringing people together because people can relate.”

Music to some is just words and a beat, but to many, it’s a force that brings people together in a way like no other. It’s an experience unique to anything else and memories hard to forget. Live music can be wild and quite painful, but it also proves to be healthy for the mind and soul.

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