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Teachers Off-Hours Grind

(illustration by Joaquin Romero) Those involved in sports at CB are faced with the challenge of balancing weekly practices and games with homework, projects, and studying. As a student-athlete, I experience the daily consequences of procrastination and late night cramming faced by many. However, I think I speak for all athletes when I say that […]

(illustration by Joaquin Romero)

Those involved in sports at CB are faced with the challenge of balancing weekly practices and games with homework, projects, and studying. As a student-athlete, I experience the daily consequences of procrastination and late night cramming faced by many. However, I think I speak for all athletes when I say that the priceless feeling I get as I take the field is worth every hour of lost sleep.

Living a physically healthy lifestyle positively affects the confidence and moods of many. We may take for granted the fact that students are not the only ones with a passion for physical fitness that clashes with their academic life. After talking with some of our most active CB teachers, I have found that they too sacrifice much of their valuable time in order to fit intense exercise into their schedules.

Reigning push-up contest champion Mr. Thomas Guro ‘03 exercises five to six times a week as it is his “chance to take an hour or two away from craziness that life sometimes brings.”

“After a good workout, I feel physically exhausted, but mentally recharged,” this gym guru explained.

Teachers come to school at the crack of dawn and stay on campus hours after we leave; while we are doing homework and studying, they are grading endless piles of papers, planning lessons, and writing tests. While exercise may take time away from their demands at work, this natural form of stress relief is a critical part of teacher’s chaotic days.

We all know Mrs. Maureen Wanket as the CB teacher who is extraordinary with her words; however, writing is not the only hobby she commits effort-filled hours to. Mr. Guro may have some competition as Mrs. Wanket follows a strict workout routine six days a week. She runs four miles two days a week and completes an intense weight and aerobics circuit on the other four days.

Mrs. Wanket has her lights out at 8 PM and is up at 4:30 AM to start her grind. She’s not messing around.

“If I do it really early in the morning when nobody is awake nobody can stop me,” the dedicated woman shared. In 2012, when Mrs. Wanket did not participate in much physical activity, she had an eye-opening experience when she could not feel her legs one day in class.

“My whole lower body was asleep — I told the kids if there is a fire drill you all have to line up without me,” she said. “That was a real wakeup call for me —my body was telling me ‘you have to look out for yourself better.’”

To former Division I collegiate athlete, Mrs. Carla Albright ‘04, a life centered around fitness feels “like the norm — it is what [she has] always known.”

Mrs. Albright gives up a few extra hours of sleep in the morning in order hit the gym. “If I don’t get up at 4:45 AM to work out, it’s most likely a lost causem” she says.

Mrs. Albright feels “happier, more patient, and better in [her] clothes and skin” after a morning workout.

I give immense credit to Mrs. Albright and Mrs. Wanket — waking up that early takes some major discipline or a whole lot of coffee! I don’t think any of us students would sacrifice a minute of our precious sleep during the school week.

The load of schoolwork that can seem unbearable to students is as much or even more heavy on our teachers. Physical activity is an excellent release valve for those of all ages and the recipe for a healthy and happy lifestyle.

To all of the stud athletes out there, do not for a second think that your teachers cannot compete with you because you’d be surprised. As many say, age is just a number.

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