Arts
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Van Gogh See Their Art

CB produces passionate painters as the four year arts program allows for daily creativity. For some, CB marked the start of their artistic outlet, but for others, art has always been a part of their personal portfolios. Student artists Helena Geach (’18) and Siena Mazza (’19) are two of the most devoted Christian Brothers creators, as their art […]

CB produces passionate painters as the four year arts program allows for daily creativity. For some, CB marked the start of their artistic outlet, but for others, art has always been a part of their personal portfolios. Student artists Helena Geach (’18) and Siena Mazza (’19) are two of the most devoted Christian Brothers creators, as their art permeates from their class-time into their free-time.

Helena Geach

Art has always run in Helena’s family, but she did not know until she met her grandmother and great-grandfather. At age 10, she met her great-grandpa and found out he was an engineer. who sketched hyper-realistic building designs for his job. Helena met her grandmother at 14 years old and was introduced to a world of painting. Her grandma is a still-life painter and has covered canvases with cars, mechanics, people and places. It finally made sense to Helena why she was so artistic after meeting the creative side of her family.

Helena specializes in “dripping eyes” as she creates different renditions often.

As a freshman, Helena started putting her artistic abilities to regular use. She never had access to any involved creative classes before attending CB, so she eagerly dove into the four year arts program.

“My school had one art class,” she said. “We could only take it our 8th grade year and even then they didn’t teach us anything.”

Landscapes and skies are some of Helena’s favorite things to shade.

Now Helena paints all the time and uses her skills to create gifts for her friends and even help paint the CB Senior wall. Throughout the four years of her high school career, she has adopted a style of shading that has become the heart of her art pieces.

“I’m just all about getting in shading and putting shape into [my art] so it has a three dimensional-ish vibe so it’s not flat.”

With the talent Helena has nurtured throughout the years, she desires to keep art in her life and future career. However, her family isn’t too sure art is a practical career choice. Helena agrees to an extent, so she has thought about career choices that incorporate art into more practical jobs.

She finds psychology fascinating so she wants to “double major in psychology and art and combine them together to do art therapy.”

With her strong desire to create and to help others, Helena’s plan to be an art therapist encompasses who she truly is.

Siena Mazza

Siena pulls out as many paints as possible to cover the canvas with color.

Siena’s family has an artistic side like Helena’s, as her aunt is an interior designer and her grandma is a painter. Because of this immediate exposure to creativity, Siena has dabbled in art since she was a young child.

“I started doing art when I was super little, like five, and I’d take a stack of paper and I’d just draw out my own stories,” she said. “That’s how I would play.”

Siena had no second thoughts about joining when she found out about the four year arts program. Any opportunity to create, Siena takes, whether it be at school or even on the East Coast.

For her final project at the Rhode Island School of Design, Siena used colored pencils to illustrate this collage of self portraits.

Siena went to the Rhode Island School of Design over the summer to participate in their art intensive program. She worked on art six hours a day, five days a week for six weeks and absolutely thrived.

“I loved it because I really got to focus on what I love. It’s different than here where I have a billion things going on. I could actually focus on art for once.”

She had to pick a major for the program and attend classes, simulating the art college experience. She decided to major in painting and attended classes in design, oil painting, and drawing foundations.

Siena described the program as, “the ultimate artistic experience”. However, she explained that the program “made me realize I don’t want to [attend] an art college because it’s just so incredibly intense.”

She still wants to continue her artistic journey throughout college and into her career, however.

This full face self portrait of Siena utilizes a pop of color to catch the eye.

“Practicality is a really big issue especially if you’re gonna go to an art school,” which is why she plans on applying as a fine arts major or a dual major in human rights and fine arts at a liberal arts college. She would love to “work in humanitarian efforts so art is always a part of [her career] as an expression and as a way to draw people closer to you”.

As a humanitarian, Siena explains she would not have to be a famous artist to share her work with others.

“I’m trying to make a statement with my art even if it effects a few people,” she says.

With her colorful and impressionistic style of creating, there is no doubt Siena’s art will catch the eyes of more than a few.

Helena and Siena have a passion for art that seeps through the classroom and into their daily lives. They both agree that art has no limits. With their talent, the possibilities to incorporate art into their professions are endless, as well.

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