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A Cellular Addiction

How much time do you use your phone during the day? Along with many people in today’s society, Christian Brothers students use their phones an overwhelming amount of time. Some people will admit that they use it constantly and it takes up too much of their day. But most people will not admit that their phone […]

How much time do you use your phone during the day?

Along with many people in today’s society, Christian Brothers students use their phones an overwhelming amount of time. Some people will admit that they use it constantly and it takes up too much of their day. But most people will not admit that their phone is a constant distraction and their total time adds up to hours within the day.

Kourtney Clark (’16) and Mary Hynes (’16) used the app called Hooked to have their total time tracked with their daily phone usage. They left the app open on their phones for the day to get an accurate amount of time.

Kourtney came out with 90 minutes for the first day using the app and 1 hour and 45 minutes for the second day. Mary had one hour and 42 minutes for the first day and the second day she had two and half hours.

“Knowing I was being tracked, I was like ‘oh no, I don’t wanna go on my phone as much'” Kourtney says. “I’m probably more on my phone than what was tracked.”

Kourtney added that she “didn’t expect all those minutes to add up.”

“You’re only on it for a few minutes,” she says. “But its multiple sittings that adds up.”

Mary Hynes honestly said that if she had more homework, she would have used her phone more.

“I usually use my phone more than that, I just had a lot of homework that night,” she claims.

She concluded that the total time varies between days.

The main idea of the tracking app is to find out if the norm for society to be on your phone constantly distracts the average person. The two girls came the same conclusion that their phones provide a safe protection in social aspects.

“I think I can distance myself from my phone,” Kourtney says. “It does distract me, instead of going and talking to new people, I’ll go on my phone.”

Mary agreed and said that, “it’s also a defense mechanism.”

“If you don’t want to talk to someone you just go straight to your phone. If you wanna avoid someone.”

Both girls were honest and were honest for some use of their cell phones. Most teens will agree with Mary and Kourtney that they also use their phones as a safe haven on social situations.

Being on cell phones for long periods of time or even for little periods multiple times, adds up. It is more important to stay present in the moment and not let a device suck your life away.

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