Community
0

Ask The Experts: 151 Years Too Late

Two of CB’s foremost historians share their thoughts on the recent awarding of a Medal of Honor. In a recent announcement, the White House revealed its intention to award the Medal of Honor to a Union Lieutenant named Cushing, who died in the Battle of Gettysburg 151 years ago. Referrals for Medals of Honor are […]

Two of CB’s foremost historians share their thoughts on the recent awarding of a Medal of Honor.

In a recent announcement, the White House revealed its intention to award the Medal of Honor to a Union Lieutenant named Cushing, who died in the Battle of Gettysburg 151 years ago.

Referrals for Medals of Honor are supposed to be made within two years of the incident. Lieutenant Cushing, at the age of 22, was severely wounded as the enemy advanced, but stood his ground and died heroically in 1863.

The Talon went to the professionals to gauge their reactions to Cushing’s award.

Mr. Vince Leporini and Mr. Michael Hood, our resident experts on the government and U.S. History, both gave their opinions on the White House’s recent action.

Each history teacher was of the same opinion about delayed awards.

“It’s always important to update our past when we know more,” Mr. Leporini says. “I don’t think the timing matters.”

Mr. Hood understands the significance of looking at historical events objectively.

“I would give one to a Confederate, too,” he says. “There are two different sides to a war and we’re distant enough that we’re not emotionally involved in [the Civil War] any more.”

While our local historians agree that the White House made the correct choice in presenting this award, the Obama administration may have had more than historical motivation on their minds.

“Did the White House do something politically motivated? Yes,” says Mr. Hood.

But Mr. Leporini says that this isn’t necessarily a bad thing.

He elaborates, saying, “[Awarding the Medal of Honor is] a great way to get a positive response from citizens who are angry right now; it looks good.”

So will we see more of these awards in the future?

“There will definitely be more petitions [for awards],” says Mr. Leporini.

Whether or not the government instructor’s prediction comes true, Lieutenant Cushing’s Medal of Honor has certainly roused an interest in the past– a history teacher’s dream come true.

Share:
  • googleplus
  • linkedin
  • tumblr
  • rss
  • pinterest
  • mail