2013 - 2014
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The Path To Citizenship

Two CB sisters realize the American Dream. In January of 2014, Victoria (’15) and Maria Paula Linares (’16) ended the long, grueling process of becoming an official American citizen. Born in Valencia, Venezuela, the sisters, their parents, and younger sister moved to the United States in 2003. For Victoria, then aged of 6, and Maria […]

Two CB sisters realize the American Dream.

In January of 2014, Victoria (’15) and Maria Paula Linares (’16) ended the long, grueling process of becoming an official American citizen.

Born in Valencia, Venezuela, the sisters, their parents, and younger sister moved to the United States in 2003. For Victoria, then aged of 6, and Maria Paula, then aged 5, first began their life in the U.S. in Corpus Christi, Texas.

However, this taste of American life was short, as they moved back to Venezuela later that year, but they returned to the States in 2005. They have been here in Sacramento ever since.

The transition for the sisters was hard as they had to learn a new language, culture, make new friends, and leave their family behind.

“Here [in Sacramento], we got better at English, but it was really sad because we didn’t have any of our family,” Victoria says.

This transition took about three years, but they finally became comfortable and fully American, but they were still not citizens.

The Linares family obtained green cards when they moved here, but after enjoying their lives in America, they decided to obtain full citizenship. In order to become an official American citizen, one must endure the process of naturalization.

This process for minors consists of living in the US for eight years and the parents of the children must pass a test. Once the test is passed, the family becomes officially American.

Victoria describes earning her citizenship as like, “winning a Grammy.” However, younger sister Maria Paula thinks it “doesn’t feel any different because we have been here for so long.”

Though differing on their opinions, both sisters are very thankful for their naturalization as they will be legally able to vote in the next election among many other American rights.

“I can eat French fries now and feel completely American!” Victoria says jokingly.

“[It’s] cool having an American passport on top of our Venezuelan and Spanish passports,” Maria Paula.  “Just traveling and being able to hold that passport, it’s really special.”

Even here at Christian Brothers, students are realizing the American dream and the many freedoms and privileges we have here in the U.S.

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